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CIGENE

Centre for Integrative Genetics

Two papers on “milk genetics”

Olsen HG, Knutsen TM, Kohler A, et al. Genome-wide association mapping for milk fat composition and fine mapping of a QTL for de novo synthesis of milk fatty acids on bovine chromosome 13. Genet Sel Evol. 2017. doi:10.1186/s12711-017-0294-5.

Ketto IA, Knutsen TM, Øyaas J, et al. Effects of milk protein polymorphism and composition, casein micelle size and salt distribution on the milk coagulation properties in Norwegian Red cattle. Int Dairy J. 2016. doi:10.1016/j.idairyj.2016.10.010.

 

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Salmon genome sequence published in Nature

Homeologous regions in the Atlantic salmon genome

Eighty million years ago, a mutant fish was born that turned out to be very successful. This mutant had a double set of hereditary material – 50 chromosomes instead of the usual 25 – and it became the ancestor of all the salmonid fishes. A lot has happened during the course of this speciation and diversification: chromosomes have split up and been jumbled around, and many gene duplicates have been lost. But even today, about half of salmon genes exist in two copies, possibly linked to the ecological flexibility of salmonids. The CIGENE team have driven the sequencing of the salmon genome from its inception to its recent publication in Nature. Continue reading “Salmon genome sequence published in Nature”

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Two new papers accepted in Genome Biology and Nature Genetics

CIGENE researchers have contributed to two new papers on genome evolution after whole genome duplication accepted in Genome biology (pre-print version: http://biorxiv.org/content/early/2017/01/05/098582) and Nature Genetics!

Congrats Fabian, Sigbjørn, Torgeir, and Simen!

 

 

 

New pre-print out on bioRxiv! (doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/140442)

A pre-print of our new paper “Diet And Life Stage Associated Remodeling Of Lipid Metabolism Regulation In The Duplicated Atlantic Salmon Genome” is out on bioRxiv.

Congrats to Gareth and Tom for a fantastic job on this!

CIGENE dives under the sheets

Nicola Barson, Simen Sandve and Torgeir Hvidsten publishes a popular science piece on sex and gender evolution in Aftenposten (http://www.aftenposten.no/viten/-Hvorfor-har-vi-sex-619458b.html)

Caught some attention on the national radio too: https://radio.nrk.no/serie/p3morgen#t=46m59s

 

Molecular biology lab

biomek fxCutting-edge genomic analysis may be performed using high-throughput genotyping pipelines. CIGENE is pleased to offer a state-of-the-art non-profit SNP genotyping service for both National and International users from research and industry organizations. Our diverse instrumentation park includes Affymetrix Gene Titans, an Illumina iScan and MiSeq, and an Agena Bioscience (formerly Sequenom) MassArray 4, all of which are supported by a high level of robot automation. Collectively, these platforms allow us to utilize high-density fixed-content arrays as well as more flexible PCR based genotyping approaches. Continue reading “Molecular biology lab”

CIGENE computational unit

cigene cluster rack frontBioinformatics is an essential and integrated part of CIGENE operations. The rapidly reduced cost of sequencing has increased demand of computational storage and analysis, and CIGENE has during the last years invested in a local computer cluster to meet this demand.
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Nicola Jane Barson

Nicola J. Barson, evolutionary biologist
Nicola Barson, evolutionary biologist

I am interested in applying genomic techniques to solve classic and applied questions in evolutionary genetics. My current focus at CIGENE is on the impact of aquaculture escapees on wild populations. As part of this work we are investigating the genomics of ecologically relevant variation in wild salmon populations.

Continue reading “Nicola Jane Barson”

Jon Olav Vik

Jon Olav Vik, systems biologist
Jon Olav Vik, systems biologist

Jon Olav is a champion for the systems biology of salmon, a research field he has been pioneering since 2013 and now spearheads in the DigiSal project. His transdisciplinary approach draws upon his broad background in quantitative biology, ranging from ecology to climate effects to cardiac modelling.

Continue reading “Jon Olav Vik”

Liver slice culture

Liver slice culture allows many “feeding trials” on the same individual, providing much better control over biological variation than live feeding trials. Here’s how: Cut out a small block of liver and superglue it to a plastic cylinder. Encase it in agar and mount it in a vibratome, a slicing machine. Each slice goes into its own lab dish, to be fed for example vegetable oil or marine oils.

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